Sunday, 20 November 2011

The constitutional status of Wales

This post addresses the legal status of the Principality of Wales and of the Prince of Wales.

The counties of Lancashire

Legally speaking, "Lancashire" (or "the county of Lancaster") can mean any one of four distinct entities:
  • The non-metropolitan county of Lancashire, as defined by the Local Government Act 1972 (Sch. 1, Part II).
  • The ceremonial county of Lancashire, as defined by the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
  • The county palatine of Lancashire, as first created in 1351 (and subsequently reconstituted).
  • The Duchy of Lancaster, as first created in 1343 or 1351 (and subsequently reconstituted).

Maitland on the monarchy and the Glorious Revolution

From F.W.Maitland, The Constitutional History of England:

Saturday, 19 November 2011

The constitutional status of Northern Ireland

I don't propose to go through the long history of British rule of Ireland.  Suffice it to quote Sir William Blackstone on the situation that pertained in his day, in the mid-18th century:

Friday, 11 November 2011

Tuesday, 1 November 2011

The privileges of Parliament

In this post, I want to look at the particular privileges attaching to Parliament, the House of Commons and the House of Lords.  These can be summed up under three broad headings.

Maitland on parliamentary sovereignty

From F.W.Maitland, The Constitutional History of England: